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REFLECTIVE PRACTICE
Project

A Lab for a New Civitas. An Innovative School in the Po Valley

by: Giorgio Adelmo Bertani , Francesca Vezzali VOLUME 5/2020 - Issue 1 , Pages: 139 - 162 doi: 10.15274/tpj.2020.05.01.10, published: 2020-06-17

Sorbolo is a beautiful town located halfway between the ancient ducal city of Parma and the Po River, within a countryside that developed from marshes, rows of poplars, embankments, vineyards. In 2016, after an initial planning process, the municipality of Sorbolo submitted to the MIUR (Ministero dell’Istruzione, dell’Università, e della Ricerca) a plan for the development of a school campus. The facility was meant to be open to the local territory and community, parents, and citizens wishing to have a stake in the decision-making processes that apply to the education and training of young people.

The first step was the construction of a new building complex destined to a 24 hour school system, accomodating approximately 450 students, ten to fourteen years old, supported by a cross-disciplinary approach: “a school for everyone, motivational, open, innovative.” The firm UFFICIO PROGETTI Architetti Associati Bertani & Vezzali, with the Sorbolo project, was the second winner of the MIUR international contest for the creation of 52 innovative schools over the entire Italian territory. 

 Open Access
SUSTAINABILITY
Book Review

Modern Architecture and Climate

by: Brian Ford VOLUME 6/2021 - Issue 1 , Pages: 265 - 270 doi: 10.15274/tpj.2021.06.01.5, published: 2021-05-07

 

Modern Architecture and Climate: Design before Air Conditioning

By Daniel A. Barber

Princeton University Press, 2020

8 in. x 10.5 in. [203 mm x 267 mm]

76 color + 196 b/w illustrations

336 pages

$60.00 / £50.00 (hardcover) 

ISBN: 978-0-691-17003-9

 

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Article

(sub)URBAN Hybrid Housing: Rethinking the City with Healthy, Sustainable Housing

by: Craig Griffen VOLUME 5/2020 - Issue 2 [HEALTHY URBANISM], Pages: 407 - 424 doi: 10.15274/tpj.2020.05.02.2, published: 2020-11-23

City dwellers have historically fled to the countryside to escape disease but returned when it was safe. US cities have experienced growth for decades, but that trend is slowing and, in some cases, reversing. Increasingly, millennials are leaving cities for the suburbs to combat escalating housing costs and lack of family-friendly amenities, and the current pandemic has sped up that rate of exodus. Urban dwelling is a very sustainable lifestyle, so how can we provide healthier and more sustainable qualities of suburban living in the city to entice people to return and/or stay? This research/design project, proposed to fill large vacant blocks in cities, produced a (sub)Urban hybrid housing model that combines qualities of suburban housing with the benefits of urban dwelling. The resulting design, based on the Charleston house typology arranged in a checkerboard pattern, provides a south-facing side yard with access from most rooms to sunlight, fresh air, shade, photovoltaic panels and a private, green, social distancing space not found in the common urban row home typology.

 Open Access
SUSTAINABILITY
Article

Waving the Magic Wand: An Argument for Reorganizing the Aridlands around Watersheds

by: Danika Cooper VOLUME 5/2020 - Issue 1 , Pages: 163 - 184 doi: 10.15274/tpj.2020.05.01.7, published: 2020-05-21

Irrigation remains the primary means of sustaining urbanization and stabilizing agricultural productivity in arid America. In the contest for the West, water is both wealth and power. Today’s struggle to overturn water scarcity is traceable through a long history of legislation overseeing land regulation, property speculation, societal development, and cultural attitudes, real and perceived, inscribed within the America’s aridlands. In reality, there is no magic wand - no miraculous technology - that alone will fulfill the needs of all who have been promised abundance in the aridlands. This paper proposes that revisiting John Wesley Powell’s 1893 proposal for aridland development in the context of today’s ecological conditions catalyzes an alternative response to today’s predictions of changing climates, and can provide the basis of an approach to the aridlands which builds from the enmeshed relationship between social and environmental systems.

 

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Article

Healthy Inner-City Communities: Toward an Integrative Framework

by: Joongsub Kim VOLUME 5/2020 - Issue 2 [HEALTHY URBANISM], Pages: 425 - 446 doi: 10.15274/tpj.2020.05.02.10, published: 2021-01-26

This paper addresses an important and timely question: How can disadvantaged communities of color become healthier? To address the question, we built on an interdisciplinary body of literature in public health and healthy community design to develop an integrative framework utilizing a variety of social capital. Community engagement and intermediaries played a critical role in constructing and facilitating the integrative framework that we applied across the study community. This study used a case study methodology reinforced by the relevant literature, participatory action research, interviews, surveys, and evaluations. The outcomes of the project suggest that the integrative framework that we built, which focuses on social capital, could provide an effective way to promote better health in disadvantaged communities. To make the framework more impactful, however, community engagement, partnerships with grassroots community organizations, a democratic design process, and the role of designers as facilitators are essential. The study’s outcomes may be useful in addressing some COVID-19 related challenges facing marginalized communities, such as lack of access to green and open space that could help residents build social capital and improve their health. 

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SUSTAINABILITY
Article

Landscape Lifecycles as a Speculative Design Research Practice for Transforming Waste Conditions

by: Catherine De Almeida VOLUME 5/2020 - Issue 1 , Pages: 185 - 220 doi: 10.15274/tpj.2020.05.01.9, published: 2020-06-23

Research-based design has been foundational for landscape architecture. Analytical layering in geographically-based mappings has become a universally applied, formulaic approach. For waste landscapes, this has generated similar redevelopment strategies for drastically differing waste landscape conditions. This site typology, however, requires more nuanced approaches. As a design-research framework, “landscape lifecycles” aims to tackle waste landscapes with integrative strategies and techniques that reactivate waste as a legible and dynamic contributor to local and regional contexts; a method for integrating multiple diverse programs rooted in economic, environmental, and social performance to form hybrid assemblages in the transformation of perceived material and spatial waste. This article highlights design-research and generative representational methods developed through projects and coursework that embrace speculation as a means of engaging with waste conditions at multiple scales — from the material to the region. These methods range from speculative geographic, process, and abstract mapping to scenario testing to time-based, projective design that document, explore, and test an argumentative hypothesis and the multi-scalar design implications of research on the imaginative potentials of waste transformation.

 Open Access
CRITICISM
Book Review

Reframing Chicago’s Residential Architecture

by: Robert Weddle VOLUME 6/2021 - Issue 1 , Pages: 271 - 276 doi: 10.15274/tpj.2021.06.01.3, published: 2021-05-07

 

Modern in the Middle: Chicago Houses 1929-1975 

By Susan S. Benjamin and Michelangelo Sabatino

New York: The Monacelli Press, 2020

279 mm x 203 mm

325 illustrations

296 pages

$ 60 hardcover

September, 2020

ISBN: 978-1580935265

 

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Article

A Productive City in a Time of Pandemics: Healthy Food Access as Justice in Baltimore

by: Cristina C. Murphy , Carla Brisotto VOLUME 5/2020 - Issue 2 [HEALTHY URBANISM], Pages: 447 - 472 doi: 10.15274/tpj.2020.05.02.5, published: 2021-01-12

Inequity is the underlying cause of today’s major societal health dilemmas. The World Health Organization (WHO) defines social health as “the conditions in which people are born, grow, live, work and age.” The success of this sequence depends on the distribution of money, power, and resources. Food is central in everyone’s life: an extended commitment for an equitable access to healthy food is necessary--even more during times of isolation due to the COVID19 pandemic. Focus group studies with community residents are important in increasing public understanding and community engagement around food accessibility, prevention of “food deserts,” and associated health issues. Urban United Roots, an organization discussed in this paper, offers an overview on how Baltimore, Maryland is assisting access to healthy food both spatially (elimination of food desert) and socially (achievement of food equity). This Baltimore-group addresses healthy food options that impact every aspect of the quality of life through the Honey Badger Promenade project in Harlem Park.

 Open Access
SUSTAINABILITY
Article

Disaster Planning Across Scales: Lessons from Post-Earthquake Rubble Management in Oaxaca, Mexico

by: Dení López , Michael Hooper VOLUME 5/2020 - Issue 1 , Pages: 221 - 250 doi: 10.15274/tpj.2020.05.01.8, published: 2020-06-10

This paper examines rubble management as an important but often neglected component of disaster response and a powerful example of the frequent disconnect between national plans and local action. It focuses on five marginalized municipalities in Oaxaca, Mexico: Ciudad Ixtepec, Asuncion Ixtaltepec, El Espinal, Juchitan de Zaragoza, and Santa Maria Xadani. These constitute the region most affected by the Mexican earthquakes of September 2017, with roughly 58% of inhabitants suffering either partial or total loss of their houses. The paper builds on the results of fifty-one interviews, a cross-sectional survey with 384 residents, and a mapping analysis to reveal the challenges of post-disaster planning across scales. The results show that local perspectives were given little consideration in nationally-led rubble management plans, and that these documents were likely shaped by concerns over what constituted institutional legitimacy, rather than attention to local context. The paper concludes with a discussion of the findings through the lens of institutional isomorphism and offers recommendations for more effective post-disaster rubble management, particularly centered on increasing the involvement and capacity of residents, municipal governments, and other key institutions.

 Open Access
CROSS-DISCIPLINARY STUDIES
Book Review

On Race and Modern Architecture

by: Diane Ghirardo VOLUME 6/2021 - Issue 1 , Pages: 277 - 284 doi: 10.15274/tpj.2021.06.01.4, published: 2021-06-04

 


 

Race and Modern Architecture.

A Critical History from the Enlightenment to the Present

By Irene Cheng, Charles L. Davis II, and Mabel O. Wilson, eds Pittsburgh PA, USA: University of Pittsburgh Press, 2020

7 x 10 in. [17,8 x 25,4 cm]

96 b&w illustrations

424 pages

 $45 paperback

July, 2020

ISBN: 978-082 296 6593

 

 

Building Character. The Racial Politics of Modern Architectural Style

By Charles L. Davis II

Pittsburg PA, USA: University of Pittsburgh Press, 2019

7 x 10 in. [17,8 x 25,4 cm] 

89 b&w illustrations, 12 color plates

320 pages

$55 hardcover

December, 2019

ISBN: 978-0822945550

 

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Article

Resilient Urban Ecologies: Adaptive Sustainable Infrastructures for Addis Ababa

by: Ruben Garcia Rubio , Taylor J. Scott VOLUME 5/2020 - Issue 2 [HEALTHY URBANISM], Pages: 473 - 494 doi: 10.15274/tpj.2020.05.02.7, published: 2021-01-25

Addis Ababa, Ethiopia’s capital city, is currently experiencing an unprecedented population boom and subsequent rapid urbanization which has fostered internal imbalances within the city’s urban landscape. To this should be added the negative effects derived from the continued impacts of a changing global climate. Together, these combined consequences have compromised the sustainable development of Addis Ababa. This essay addresses the initial outcomes of the “Addis Ababa River City” research project, an academic program created to address these aforementioned challenges through a holistic urban resilience strategy and design methodology. To do this, the research project proposes the use of a sustainable infrastructure as the primary design intervention, where the existing ecological elements serve as the foundational backbone but also include other urban dimensions. This paper will elaborate on the design methodology and resulting sustainable infrastructure intervention in two different and nested scales, the upper region of the Kebena river and Peacock Park. Together, this body of work demonstrates how to elucidate a holistic understanding of the complex urban realities that Addis Ababa, and many other growing worldwide metropolises, face today and into the future.

 Open Access
CRITICISM
Book Review

Aldo Rossi: Representing Life

by: Raffaella Neri VOLUME 5/2020 - Issue 1 , Pages: 253 - 259 doi: 10.15274/tpj.2020.05.01.3, published: 2020-05-11


 

Aldo Rossi and the Spirit of Architecture

By Diane Y. F. Ghirardo

London: Yale University Press

254 mm x 203 mm

135 color + 5 b/w illustrations

280 pages

US$65 / £50.00 GBP (hardback)

ISBN: 978-0300234930

 

 Open Access
CRITICISM
Exhibition Review

Carlo Aymonino: The Critical Curiosity of a Visionary Architect

by: Maurizio Sabini VOLUME 6/2021 - Issue 1 , Pages: 285 - 293 doi: 10.15274/tpj.2021.06.01.15, published: 2021-06-15
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Article

Rewilding the LA River: Water, Legislation, and Precarious Futures

by: Nicole Lambrou VOLUME 5/2020 - Issue 2 [HEALTHY URBANISM], Pages: 495 - 519 doi: 10.15274/tpj.2020.05.02.11, published: 2021-02-02

Today’s Los Angeles region first concentrated around its river, which now meanders through the city’s disparate social topography for over fifty miles as a largely concrete channel before it discharges into the Pacific Ocean. Since the city’s inception various actors, including engineers, planners, and Supreme Court justices, actively shaped the image of the LA River through flood control practices. This article traces these framings and their co-constitution with policy and legislation in shaping collective visions of the LA River: a source of sustenance, a force of water, a concrete landscape to be celebrated, a desolate wasteland, a dormant ecology, and critical infrastructure for a resilient LA climate future.

 Open Access
CRITICISM
Conference Report

Giancarlo De Carlo. A Symposium

by: Sara Marini , Marko Pogacnik VOLUME 5/2020 - Issue 1 , Pages: 261 - 278 doi: 10.15274/tpj.2020.05.01.2, published: 2020-05-11
 Open Access
CRITICISM
Book Review

Women [Re]Build: Stories, Polemics, Futures

by: Lynnette Widder VOLUME 4/2019 - Issue 2 [GENDER MATTERS], Pages: 519 - 523 doi: 10.15274/tpj.2019.04.02.14, published: 2020-02-11

 

 

 

Women [Re]Build: Stories, Polemics, Futures          

By Franca Trubiano, Ramona Adlakha, and Ramune Bartuskaite (eds.)   

Novato CA, USA: Applied Research and Design / Oro Editions, 2019, 2018

241 mm x 165 mm

144 pages

US$ 29.95 (paperback)

ISBN: 978-1-943532-43-8

 

 

 Open Access
THEORY
In Memoriam

Remembering Robert Venturi, a Modern Mannerist

by: Maurizio Sabini VOLUME 4/2019 - Issue 1 , Pages: 253 - 259 doi: 10.15274/tpj.2019.04.01.1, published: 2018-10-05

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CROSS-DISCIPLINARY STUDIES
Article

Architectural Portraits: ῾The MIES Project’

by: Arina Dähnick VOLUME 5/2020 - Issue 1 , Pages: 9 - 30 doi: 10.15274/tpj.2020.05.01.4, published: 2020-05-14

This article wants to offer a brief overview of my experience as an architectural photographer and of “The Mies Project” in particular, on which I have been working on for the past few years. My approach to photography, based on the latest digital technology but also on the Leica M-System, is briefly outlined. In the past, the question was how to obtain information. Nowadays, the proper structuring of information is what really matters. Architectural Portraits, a small selection of which from “The Mies Project” are here presented, are “intimate gazes,” prioritizing the relationship of the detail of a building with its surrounding, the interaction between construction details, lighting and weather conditions. In this sense, Mies’ works not only have sparked my interest in architectural photography, but have been also the perfect poetic partner for my research.

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Article

Women Who Design “Master” Bedrooms: A Study of Kerala Women in Architectural Practice

by: Soumini Raja , Sumitra Nair VOLUME 4/2019 - Issue 2 [GENDER MATTERS], Pages: 429 - 447 doi: 10.15274/tpj.2019.04.02.9, published: 2020-02-05

While the practice of architecture has traditionally been a male-dominated field in India, gender discourse in architecture has been slowly shifting the gender balance towards an increased participation of women in architectural practice and academics, as both leaders and team members. This paper explores the nuances of feminist spatial practices locating itself in the state of Kerala, India, that has historically unique gender politics. The paper draws on an ethnographically informed study of twelve women architects, using “Master Bedrooms” as a discursive tool to capture their engagement in professional practice. The study revealed that the critical feminist spatial practice is not watertight nor a conscious way of practice. It does not even require conformity to any one idea of feminism. These women practitioners deploy multiple modes of engaging with and challenging the dominant norms of professional practice. These range from conscious acts of individual subversion to organizational structuring, from overt challenges to quiet resistance. This paper offers to problematise contemporary discourse on critical feminist spatial practices in the context of India and thereby, contribute to critical spatial pedagogies.

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Article

On the Work of Lisbeth Sachs: From the Aesthetic to the Environmental Impact of Architecture

by: Stamatina Kousidi VOLUME 4/2019 - Issue 2 [GENDER MATTERS], Pages: 481 - 501 doi: 10.15274/tpj.2019.04.02.8, published: 2020-01-23

Characterized by continuity, inventiveness, and a fervent exploration of the relationship between architecture and the environment at large, the work of Lisbeth Sachs was included in the 1979 issue of the Aktuelles Bauen magazine on women and architecture. This contribution proposes an in-depth review of Sachs’ underexplored work, suggesting a better understanding of her role as a practicing woman architect at a time when this task was not a matter of course. It places an emphasis on the dialogue Sachs established with her contemporaries, on the dense network of experiences that shaped her design approach, and on the ways it intersected with the late twentieth-century discourse on the relationship between architecture, ecology, and nature. It is not coincidental that the work of Frei Otto would have a long-lasting influence on Sachs’ design experimentation, informing her theoretical and applied design projects. Her design exploration, too, was influenced by the technological advances, the societal changes and the shifts in the cultural agency of  architecture, proposing each time a solution that addressed, rather than excluded, its surrounding context, cultural, physical, or environmental. 

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Article

The W@ARCH.PT as an Ongoing Feminist Research Project in Architecture: Contextualizing Initial Reflections

by: Patrícia Santos Pedrosa VOLUME 4/2019 - Issue 2 [GENDER MATTERS], Pages: 391 - 402 doi: 10.15274/tpj.2019.04.02.7, published: 2020-01-16

In Portugal, the participation of female architects in the development of the profession – in the broad sense of the word: project, research, education, criticism, and policy – is far from having been identified, problematized, and disseminated. The research project  W@ARCH.PT (Women Architects in Portugal: Building Visibility, 1942-1986) strives to give visibility to female architects – revealing “who?”, “when?”, and “how?” – and contribute to expanding the history of Portuguese architecture, as well as developing feminist studies and ideas within the discipline. The strategies chosen to carry out this ongoing research intersect with feminist theories and epistemologies, outside and inside architecture. The issues raised require a critical understanding of the processes that sustain the silencing of female architects’ voices, imposing limitations on how we understand the profession in its many facets. The feminist historical reflection that we propose is based on the idea that combining the production of knowledge and professional practices is crucial to change gender biases and women’s oppression in both fields.

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Article

Women Leaders, the Sustainable Society Cannot Afford to Miss: A Qualitative Study on the Paths to Women Leadership in Sustainable Architecture Education

by: Liqun Bi , Barbara LaCost , Hengle Jiang VOLUME 4/2019 - Issue 2 [GENDER MATTERS], Pages: 345 - 369 doi: 10.15274/tpj.2019.04.02.6, published: 2020-02-05

 Candice Stevens has pointed out that the lack of progress on gender equality may be at the heart of the failure to advance on sustainable development. Several researchers such as Sandra Manley and Ann de Graft‐Johnson, and Rosa Sheng and Annelise Pitts have studied why women leave architecture, but no study focused on the women’s leadership in architecture education yet. This qualitative study aimed to discover insight into the leadership development journey of women focusing on sustainable architecture education. The sample was selected among 1,705 faculties of forty-one collegiate architecture programs. After email invitations, five successful women executives in sustainable architecture areas participated in the interviews. After coding analysis, three conclusions illuminated. Firstly, strong mothers influence daughters to become leaders. Secondly, the inner motivation of “working super hard” is the foundational factor that all the women leader participants claimed to sustain their leadership advancement. Thirdly, participants unveiled that there was an on-going-pattern while finishing the tasks and establishing reputations, especially in early career development. The awareness of the pattern helped to reduce the panic of the new tasks.

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Essay

Making Room and Occupying Space. Women Conquering and Designing Urban Spaces

by: Chiara Belingardi , Claudia Mattogno VOLUME 4/2019 - Issue 2 [GENDER MATTERS], Pages: 371 - 390 doi: 10.15274/tpj.2019.04.02.5, published: 2019-12-06

Women have always been strongly involved in creating environment and living spaces, even without initially being designers as the university became accessible to them very late. However, they were always strong involved in creating a healthy environment, and contributing to welfare state, where health and social equipment was a gender response to a modern life. Anyway, the history of architecture remains dominated by Masters and the female presence is almost invisible, even though women’s studies have made a large contribution to investigate lives, stories, and professional works. The paper highlights the contribution of women as builders of social and physical spaces from late nineteenth and focuses on Italian movements of second and third generation feminists. Nowadays feminists are pointing out invisibility of women as a structural violence, are claiming commons and creating new uses for urban space.

 Open Access
Article

Jiyūgaoka as Women’s Realm: A Case Study on Tokyo Genderfication

by: Noemí Gómez Lobo , Yoshiharu Tsukamoto , Diego Martín Sánchez VOLUME 4/2019 - Issue 2 [GENDER MATTERS], Pages: 403 - 427 doi: 10.15274/tpj.2019.04.02.4, published: 2019-12-18

Framed within the question of how gender influences the production of urban space, this study reveals how Jiyūgaoka, a high-end suburban area in Tokyo, has developed by targeting a particular gender role: women as caretakers and consumers. Car-safe and bike-friendly, Jiyūgaoka pedestrian areas have more greenery, pavement, and urban furniture in comparison with the average Tokyo street. Jiyūgaoka spatial practices encourage the meeting of people in the public realm, creating relationships between behaviors and their supporting physical environment. By aiming at women, other non-normative bodies were rendered into the city, enhancing public life and creating an accessible milieu. Jiyūgaoka genderfication process, by which the overlaying of commercial and gender mechanisms has impacted urban phenomena, is shown through a chronological investigation of gender-charged contents and its mapping in the urban fabric. This study demonstrates how urban transformation in Jiyūgaoka has encompassed changes in the lives of women in Japanese society. Representative examples from each period illustrate the physical translation of this development, from a home cooking school to a promenade with hundreds of benches.

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Essay

Women’s Work: Attributing Future Histories of the Digital in Architecture

by: Shelby Doyle , Nick Senske VOLUME 4/2019 - Issue 2 [GENDER MATTERS], Pages: 307 - 326 doi: 10.15274/tpj.2019.04.02.3, published: 2019-12-06

Conventions of authorship and attribution historically excluded or erased women’s contributions to the built environment. As frequent co-authors and collaborators, women’s stories often do not fit into conventional historical narratives about how architecture is created. In response, this essay proposes a technology called “attribution frameworks”: a digital method for creating a transparent record of architectural labor. The authors argue that the integration of digital tools into architectural design offers a new space for more equally attributing, documenting, and counting labor and contributions to the discipline. This space allows for a more rich and inclusive narrative of contributions to architectural production for the future.

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