THE PLAN Journal (TPJ) intends to disseminate and promote innovative, thought-provoking and relevant research, studies and criticism in architecture and urbanism. The criteria for selecting contributions will be innovation, clarity of purpose and method, and potential transformational impact on disciplinary fields or the broader socio-cultural context. The ultimate purpose of the TPJ is to enrich the dialog between research and professional fields, in order to encourage both applicable new knowledge and intellectually driven modes of practice. (Maurizio Sabini)

Latest Articles

 Open Access
THEORY
Essay

American Mirror: the Occupation of the ‘New World’ and the Rise of Architecture as We Know It

by: Fernando Luiz Lara VOLUME 5/2020 - Issue 1 , Pages: 1 - 18 doi: 10.15274/tpj.2020.05.01.5, published: 2020-05-18

This paper argues that the rise of architecture as a unique discipline and the conquest of the American continent are not just chronological coincidences but interdependent variables of the same process of modernization. Traditional scholarship in architecture has not entertained those parallel developments at all. The field of architectural history and theory still treats the spatial occupation of the Americas as a consequence of the Renaissance and European modernization, despite a few decades of scholarly literature in related disciplines questioning such assumptions. (Fanon 1961; Said 1978; Dussel 1980; Bhabha 1987;  Escobar 1994). Such scholarship demonstrates that the encounter of 1492 and the territorial occupation that followed played a central role in the development of Western culture in general, allowing the extrapolation of the same logic to the architectural discipline in particular. 

 Subscribers only
CROSS-DISCIPLINARY STUDIES
Article

Architectural Portraits: ῾The MIES Project’

by: Arina Dähnick VOLUME 5/2020 - Issue 1 , Pages: 1 - 22 doi: 10.15274/tpj.2020.05.01.4, published: 2020-05-14

This article wants to offer a brief overview of my experience as an architectural photographer and of “The Mies Project” in particular, on which I have been working on for the past few years. My approach to photography, based on the latest digital technology but also on the Leica M-System, is briefly outlined. In the past, the question was how to obtain information. Nowadays, the proper structuring of information is what really matters. Architectural Portraits, a small selection of which from “The Mies Project” are here presented, are “intimate gazes,” prioritizing the relationship of the detail of a building with its surrounding, the interaction between construction details, lighting and weather conditions. In this sense, Mies’ works not only have sparked my interest in architectural photography, but have been also the perfect poetic partner for my research.

 Open Access
CRITICISM
Book Review

Aldo Rossi: Representing Life

by: Raffaella Neri VOLUME 5/2020 - Issue 1 , Pages: 1 - 8 doi: 10.15274/tpj.2020.05.01.3, published: 2020-05-11


 

Aldo Rossi and the Spirit of Architecture

By Diane Y. F. Ghirardo

London: Yale University Press

254 mm x 203 mm

135 color + 5 b/w illustrations

280 pages

US$65 / £50.00 GBP (hardback)

ISBN: 978-0300234930

 

 Open Access
CRITICISM
Conference Report

Giancarlo De Carlo. A Symposium

by: Sara Marini , Marko Pogacnik VOLUME 5/2020 - Issue 1 , Pages: 1 - 18 doi: 10.15274/tpj.2020.05.01.2, published: 2020-05-11
 Open Access
SUSTAINABILITY
Article

Waving the Magic Wand: An Argument for Reorganizing the Aridlands around Watersheds

by: Danika Cooper VOLUME 5/2020 - Issue 1 , Pages: 1 - 22 doi: 10.15274/tpj.2020.05.01.7, published: 2020-05-21

Irrigation remains the primary means of sustaining urbanization and stabilizing agricultural productivity in arid America. In the contest for the West, water is both wealth and power. Today’s struggle to overturn water scarcity is traceable through a long history of legislation overseeing land regulation, property speculation, societal development, and cultural attitudes, real and perceived, inscribed within the America’s aridlands. In reality, there is no magic wand - no miraculous technology - that alone will fulfill the needs of all who have been promised abundance in the aridlands. This paper proposes that revisiting John Wesley Powell’s 1893 proposal for aridland development in the context of today’s ecological conditions catalyzes an alternative response to today’s predictions of changing climates, and can provide the basis of an approach to the aridlands which builds from the enmeshed relationship between social and environmental systems.

 

 Subscribers only
THEORY
Essay

On the CIAM 7 Grid: From an Ideological to a Critical Tool

by: Pierre-Alain Croset , Andrea Canclini VOLUME 5/2020 - Issue 1 , Pages: 1 - 28 doi: 10.15274/tpj.2020.05.01.6, published: 2020-05-21

Much historiographical research has been produced on the post-war CIAMs, demonstrating the importance of the CIAM Grid, proposed as a “thinking tool” for representing the town planning projects at the CIAM 7 in Bergamo (1949). This essay proposes a new critical and epistemological examination of the CIAM Grid based on new archival documents and on a rereading of the exact words used by Le Corbusier, who proposed to consider the Grid as an “interlocutor.” Seventy years later, we propose to go beyond the failure of CIAM 7 and to elaborate a “new Grid,” with the name of “Second Life Grid,” as a critical tool for discussing exclusively projects related to the new paradigm of recycling and reusing buildings and urban spaces. Beginning with the question of the critical legacy of the CIAM Grid, our intention was to think of a Grid conceived no longer as an instrument of dogmatic and normative thought, but as an instrument of dialogical criticism which has been tested through an open call for projects and an international conference held in Bergamo in October, 2019.

 Subscribers only
CROSS-DISCIPLINARY STUDIES
Essay

Wellbeing in the Built Environment: Designing Discontinuities Between Function and Semantic

by: Nicoletta Brancaccio , Davide Giacomo Maria Gattoni , Federico Niola , Stefano Rozzi VOLUME 5/2020 - Issue 1 , Pages: 1 - 22 doi: 10.15274/tpj.2020.05.01.1, published: 2020-05-21

Space is relational. How many relationships can occupy a space? How do they work? These are both interesting questions that we would like to answer. We know that we interact with space and that its configuration affects us: we can be aggregative while experiencing it, rather than competitive. Space has considerable power in influencing our brain. Essentially, our actions are somehow manipulated by what we see and what we touch. How does our space (peripersonal space) interfere with another’s? The idea of interaction within space (or social space) and space of selfhood thus becomes an essential subject for architecture and cannot be simply parameterized in a geometric manner. Physical space must, therefore, allow solitary or cooperative movement without alienating the individual. We base our judgments on movement, culture, personal psychical characteristics, memory, and personal experience. Taking these elements as our base, we gave a new perspective for designers to draw from the semantic, which can be rhetorical and disconnected by the function.

 Open Access
EDITORIAL
Editorial

Beyond What Is Right

by: Maurizio Sabini VOLUME 4/2019 - Issue 2 [GENDER MATTERS], Pages: 269 - 271 doi: 10.15274/tpj.2019.04.02.13, published: 2020-02-07
 Open Access
Position Paper

Gender Matters. The Grand Architectural Revolution

by: Dörte Kuhlmann, Guest-Editor VOLUME 4/2019 - Issue 2 [GENDER MATTERS], Pages: 273 - 279 doi: 10.15274/tpj.2019.04.02.12, published: 2020-02-07

Board