THE PLAN Journal (TPJ) intends to disseminate and promote innovative, thought-provoking and relevant research, studies and criticism in architecture and urbanism. The criteria for selecting contributions will be innovation, clarity of purpose and method, and potential transformational impact on disciplinary fields or the broader socio-cultural context. The ultimate purpose of the TPJ is to enrich the dialog between research and professional fields, in order to encourage both applicable new knowledge and intellectually driven modes of practice. (Maurizio Sabini)

LATEST ARTICLES

 Open Access
THEORY
In Memoriam

Remembering Robert Venturi, a Modern Mannerist

by: Maurizio Sabini VOLUME 4/2019 - Issue 1 , Pages: 1 - 7 doi: 10.15274/tpj.2019.04.01.1, published: 2018-10-05

 Open Access
CRITICISM
Exhibition Review

"FREESPACE" and the Citizen: Stories of Generosity from the Venice Architecture Biennale 2018

by: Carla Brisotto , Cristina Cassandra Murphy , Martha Battaglin Ramos VOLUME 4/2019 - Issue 1 , Pages: 9 - 24 doi: 10.15274/tpj.2019.04.01.2, published: 2018-10-30

 Open Access
EDITORIAL
Article

In This Issue [1/2018]

by: Maurizio Sabini VOLUME 3/2018 - Issue 1 , Pages: 5 - 6 doi: doi: 10.15274/tpj.2018.03.01.14, published: 2018-08-02
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TYPOLOGY
Project

"L’École Poreuse" (1) A Project for an Innovative School

by: Riccardo Zuliani , Brunella Angeli VOLUME 3/2018 - Issue 1 , Pages: 91 - 125 doi: 10.15274/tpj.2018.03.01.13, published: 2018-08-02

This paper details the design solution awarded at the 2017 international call for ideas for the design and implementation of fifty “innovative schools” launched by the Italian Ministry of Education and Research (MIUR). The project expands an ongoing personal research, focusing on the class layout in relation to the educational curriculum proposed inspired by the principles of Social Constructivism and with the final aim of providing continuity among nursery, infant and primary schools. The “School of Tomorrow” designed for the MIUR has no traditional desk, but modular tables of different sizes. There is no teacher desk, but an educator who moves among students, both in class and in the communal areas. Instead of the traditional class, there are size reconfigurable areas according to subjects taught and students’ needs. This school offers labs, ateliers and workshops. It has no corridors, but connective spaces equipped with poufs, sofas, soft seats and carpets. These areas become the functional and symbolic heart of the school - the Piazza and the Learning Street - hosting parties, assemblies, student works exhibitions and theatrical performances. The school of the future will stay open beyond school hours and will play the role of a civic center.

 Subscribers only
DIGITAL TECHNOLOGY
Article

An Ontology of Robotic Architecture

by: Mahesh Daas , Andrew John Wit VOLUME 3/2018 - Issue 1 , Pages: 127 - 139 doi: 10.15274/tpj.2018.03.01.12, published: 2018-08-01

Robotics has recently found themselves more engrained within the ethos of architectural research and production. However, their relationship to architecture still remains to be understood. This article examines the relationship between robotics and architecture from an ontological standpoint. The article offers foundational frameworks and raises key questions to broadly define robotics in architecture.

 Open Access
CROSS-DISCIPLINARY STUDIES
Essay

An Urban/Landscape Project for the Venice Lagoon

by: Claudio Aldegheri VOLUME 3/2018 - Issue 1 , Pages: 191 - 207 doi: 10.15274/tpj.2018.03.01.11, published: 2018-07-16

In recent years, in the Venice lagoon we have seen an increasing number of urban planning projects with a low level of flexibility, which have not seized the opportunities offered by such a rich and complex context. This study is therefore about how to approach the project in this area, aiming to give value to its many different landscape aspects and attempting to reconsider in general the attitude to urban planning.

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CRITICISM
Essay

Pouillon’s Practical Theory. A Design Method for Contemporary Architectural Practice

by: Emilio Mossa VOLUME 3/2018 - Issue 1 , Pages: 47 - 68 doi: 10.15274/tpj.2018.03.01.10, published: 2018-07-07

The aim of this paper is to underline the currency and modernity of Fernand Pouillon’s method for contemporary architectural practices. In particular, this dissertation analyzes the theory hidden behind Pouillon’s practice, and the motivation influencing the final quality of his works in order to make this method implementable to the current conditions of architectural design related to the management of complexity, buildability and quality of buildings. This paper explains Pouillon’s design process through the case study of Résidence Les 200 Logements, or dwellings, built in Aix-en-Provence between 1951 and 1955. This work represents the turning point experience in the development of a design methodology that Pouillon will use for the following twenty years of his career. The 200 Logements project demonstrates the absolute effectiveness of this design method to achieve a certain quality in all the production phases. By merging technological and humanistic culture, the buildings designed by Pouillon exemplify the possibility of making theory through practice. Intended as “practical theories,” the models and the approaches proposed by Pouillon represent a design method that can still be used today.

 Open Access
LANDSCAPE URBANISM
Article

Cities as Hydro-Geologic Terrain: Design Research to Transform Urban Surfaces

by: Mary Pat McGuire VOLUME 3/2018 - Issue 1 , Pages: 165 - 190 doi: 10.15274/tpj.2018.03.01.09, published: 2018-07-02

Imperviousness is a significant design problem for the future of cities: we must reduce it, redesign it, transform it. This paper argues to insert hydro-terrain thinking to the paved surfaces of cities, instantiating the concept of “rain terrain” that links hydrologic performance across scales, from the raindrop to the region. The City of Chicago is the case study where high concentrations of pavement drain stormwater from the city - resulting in flooding, overflowing and polluting - from the Great Lakes to the Gulf of Mexico. I first share research on the glaciated history of the region, to reveal sandy soil types located in the urban area. I then correlate imperviousness, permeable soils and flooding prevalence to identify a pattern of site opportunity areas in the city. I also propose design practices - through disruptions, interventions and reconfigurations of urban surface - to tap paved-over soils as the basis for a landscape-based urban stormwater approach. In doing so, this paper aims to present a vision for urban transformation, based on specific technical design opportunities within landscape-as-infrastructure.

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LANDSCAPE URBANISM
Project

Chicago’s Urban Rivers

by: Carol Ross Barney VOLUME 3/2018 - Issue 1 , Pages: 141 - 164 doi: 10.15274/tpj.2018.03.01.08, published: 2018-07-02

Chicago, like other major cities, traces its growth back to a connection with water. As the city grew, the river became the backbone of commerce and economic prosperity. However, this thriving resource was not always looked upon with a sense of stewardship and care. In the wake of post-industrialization, much of the manufacturing had moved from the banks of the Chicago River, leaving behind disconnected communities and a polluted riverbed. For nearly two decades, Ross Barney Architects has been working along Chicago’s rivers. These efforts include the design of the Chicago Riverwalk, studies on all 150 mi. [241 km] of riverfront across the city, and an exhibition at the Chicago Architecture Biennial. The goal was to reconnect people with the dynamic and changing life of the river.

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